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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

30 Sep2020

Boosting Ghana’s Industry for Sustained Growth

Published by The Daily Graphic

Ghana's economic growth has been rapid since the start of the new millennium, reaching 14% in 2011, but economic performance has been relatively lower since then, particularly from 2013-2016. Important factors for the slowing of development are the huge infrastructural deficit and the limited fiscal space, but Ghana has the potential for improvement thanks to its large natural resource deposits. The country has historically relied on the extraction of these abundant resources for economic and social development, and global business attention has focused on several sectors, including oil and...

22 Sep2020

Transformed Transportation to Boost Growth

Published by The Daily Graphic

Ghana has been experiencing steady economic development, but GDP growth has not been supported with enough infrastructure to boost welfare sustainably in the long term. One of the sectors requiring urgent improvement is transport. The road network comprises over 78,000 kilometers, but only 49% of it is maintained or rehabilitated. Up to 60% of the 1300-kilometer rail network is not used regularly due to lack of maintenance. This absence of necessary infrastructure limits commerce and exports, and slows down Ghana’s economic growth prospects and even tourism, given that many of the major...

16 Sep2020

Sorry, solar panels won’t stop California’s fires

Published by New York Post

The massive fires raging in California are being blamed squarely on climate change. Alongside ominous photographs of orange skies, the front page of the Sunday Los Angeles Times blared: “California’s Climate Apocalypse.” Golden State Gov. Gavin Newsom says the cause is climate change. Anyone who thinks differently, he insists, is in denial. The governor is right that climate change is real, man-made and something we need to deal with smartly. But the claim that the fires are caused by climate change is grossly misleading. Translated into policy, it would steer the state to the worst way to...

16 Sep2020

Modernised Administration for Increased Autonomy

Published by The Daily Graphic

Digitising public administration at the local level improves efficiency and productivity. Faster and simpler revenue collection, especially, boosts transparency and increases municipalities’ autonomy by enhancing their ability to generate more local income in a systematic manner. Ghana has a legal decentralisation framework that allows for the fiscal autonomy of the Metropolitan, Municipal, and District Assemblies (MMDAs) with important planning and coordination functions. The MMDAs are responsible for infrastructure and service delivery in key sectors of public life: waste management,...

13 Aug2020

Equal Access to Health Care

Published by The Daily Graphic

Ghanaians’ health issues have shifted over time, from infectious diseases and maternal and child health problems to ever more non-communicable diseases. The current co-existence of diseases like malaria and tuberculosis with hypertension, stroke, and diabetes presents a challenge for the country’s health care system, and especially for the poor.

30 Jul2020

Transforming Ghana’s Agricultural Sector

Published by The Daily Graphic

Agriculture is a significant contributor to the Ghanaian economy and an important source of employment, with over 40% of all workers engaged in farming. With growth and development, the country is gradually shifting away from this sector towards industry and services, but agriculture is still key for the economy, and a necessary vehicle for reducing poverty and food insecurity. Increasing agricultural output is an important policy goal of the government, and can be achieved through three main mechanisms: increasing area under cultivation, improving the yield, and reducing post-harvest losses...

17 Jul2020

The alarm about climate change is blinding us to sensible solutions

Published by The Globe and Mail

It wasn’t that long ago when much of the global elite had conclusively decided that climate change was our world’s top priority. Then came a massive sideswiping by a global pandemic, of which we have only seen the first wave, along with an equally massive global recession. It serves as a timely reminder that an alarmism that cultivates one fear over others serves society poorly. In the “BC” era – Before Coronavirus – the World Health Organization famously called climate change the “greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.” Even as coronavirus tentacles were already spreading, the...

17 Jul2020

The alarm about climate change is blinding us to sensible solutions

Published by The Globe and Mail

It wasn’t that long ago when much of the global elite had conclusively decided that climate change was our world’s top priority. Then came a massive sideswiping by a global pandemic, of which we have only seen the first wave, along with an equally massive global recession. It serves as a timely reminder that an alarmism that cultivates one fear over others serves society poorly.

16 Jul2020

For Cleaner and Healthier Rural Communities

Published by The Daily Graphic

Clean and healthy communities require proper sanitation, but one in every three people in the world still lacks access to a dignified sanitation service. Ghana has also struggled to improve sanitation coverage, and the situation remains challenging, especially in rural communities where private latrines are scarce. Throughout the entire UN Millennium Development Goals period, between 2000 and 2015, the percentage of rural households practicing open defecation dropped by only one percentage point, to 31%. As of 2017, about 4 million people in rural Ghana still practiced open defecation, and...

14 Jul2020

Climate change is important—but it shouldn’t distract us from other crucial problems

Published by Fortune

What is the point of climate change policy? To make the world a better place for all of us, and for future generations. In my new book, False Alarm: How Climate Change Panic Costs Us Trillions, Hurts the Poor, and Fails to Fix the Planet, I analyze a lot of ways to make smart climate policy—and many that unfortunately waste resources. But we also need to ask ourselves the broader question: If the goal is to make the world a better place, is climate change policy the most important thing to focus on?

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